In short

Gamma auction: 50 years, 50 prints in favor of Reporters Without Borders

An auction of photographs of the Gamma agency is held on Sunday, October 23 at 7PM at the City of Ar...

5th edition of the Photoreporter Festival of Saint-Brieuc

Created in 2012, the photojournalist Festival in the bay of Saint-Brieuc (Britanny) launches its fif...

Boutographies : Call for submissions, until November 13

As every year the Boutographies launch their call for submissions for its next edition, which will h...
Chelsea Girls, 1966 © Alan Aldridge
Chelsea Girls, 1966 © Alan Aldridge

For the release of the The Photobook: A History (Vol. 3), Le BAL in Paris organized a discussion with the authors, Gerry Badger and Martin Parr, who presented a selection of ten photobooks featured in their history.

Libya Jamhiriya (1981) was selected as a typical example of propaganda. It illustrates a chapter on the importance of the book in the history of ideologies. Then came publications related to “protests”: Complete Photo Story of Till Murder Case (1955) by Ernest Withers and Sanrizuka (1969-1971) by Kazuo Kitai, published in 1971. Both are testimonies, the first to a murder and the second to the end of a battle.

Franco Ortoloni’s La Festa del Parco Lambro (1978) revisits the sexual liberation of the Woodstock generation in Italy and explores a time when freedom had to be won through violence.

The two following publications are found in the chapter on “Modern Life.” Open See (2009) by Jim Goldberg was selected for its similarity to a multimedia story, and Gomorrah Girl (2011) by Valerio Spada for its formal and thematic “cohabitation” of two parallel stories.

A perfect illustration of the “personalization of documentary photography over the last sixty years,” the monograph In History (2008) from Susan Meiselas, with manuscript texts and press clippings, foreshadows, according Gerry Badger, what the photobook of tomorrow will look like. “Identity” and the relationship between a photographer and his model is explored in Sabine (2004) by Jacob Aue Sobol, while “memory” is the theme of Rachel, Monique (2012) by Sophie Calle, which Badger uses to explain how he sees the “personalization” of photography.

The selection ends with a mystery: The Great Unreal (2009) from Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs takes its meaning from the chapter devoted to “representation and re-presentation” in photography. Inspired by an American road trip, the images are presented as a montage, and the viewer is never sure if the images are real or illusions.

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Martin Parr

Martin Parr was born in Epsom, Surrey, UK, in 1952. When he was a boy, his budding interest in the medium of photography was encouraged by his grandfather George Parr, himself a keen amateur photographer. Martin Parr studied photography at...

Martin Parr in Paris: two
books and an exhibition

Martin Parr, whose prolific body of work is identifiable by its caustic, kitschy colors and the grotesquerie of the situations, has taken pains to photograph proletarian culture in order to bring out the alleged excesses of Western society with all its opulence and ennui. For Par...

Martin Parr, Selfportrait from the publisher Xavier Barral
Aux éditions Xavier Barral

The publisher Xavier Barral has just published “Martin Parr, autoportrait”, the new edition of the original work that came out in England in 2000. This new edition has been updated with more than 70 previously unpublished photographs.