In short

Book Signing with Manfred Heiting on Saturday, Feb 25th in LA

Photographer Manfred Heiting will be signing his new book entitled The Soviet Photobook this Saturd...

Ren Hang, Chinese erotic photographer, commits suicide

Le photographe chinois Ren Hang, né en 1987, s’est suicidé ce 24 février 2017.

Conversation with the owners of the Lumière des Roses’ gallery

Since 2004, Marion and Philippe Jacquier exhibit and sell "icons of anonymous photography" in their ...
PHOTO OF THE DAY
Le commandant Charcot en 1908 © Maurice-Louis Branger - Roger-Viollet
Le commandant Charcot en 1908 © Maurice-Louis Branger - Roger-Viollet

From 1981 to the beginning of 1984 I worked on a photography project as part of the New York Chinatown History Project (NYCHP), now the Museum of Chinese in America.  An older generation of Chinatown was being replaced by a rapidly expanding new influx of immigration. As a photographer, my goal was to document the transformation from an older and primarily male community (due to restrictive, discriminatory immigration laws) to a new generation of young families.

Recently I began scanning and making large prints of the Chinatown negatives. It’s exciting to revisit personal work that I did more than 30 years ago and interpret it digitally, a process that allows me the ability to get more out of a negative than I ever could in the darkroom. I’m able to give new life to old work. More importantly, time has changed me and the way that I see the work. I’ve found images, overlooked in the past, that due to the passage of time have taken on new meaning and import.

The early 1980’s was a unique time in the history of New York Chinatown. With the passage of time I see how my documentation of Chinatown life can both communicate what it felt like to live in Chinatown at that time and inform our current societal discussion of immigration.

http://budglickphoto.com/#/portfolio/chinatown-ny/ctown11

http://www.mocanyc.org

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PHOTOGRAPHER
Bud Glick