In short

World Press Photo settles in Barcelona

Starting tomorrow over a month, World Press Photo will present its 2017 winners at the Centre de Cu...

First Luxembourg Street Photography Festival Launches

This Friday, the Luxembourg Street Phootgraphy Festival will launch its very-first edition in Roton...

Discussion on Humanist Photography at Voz’Gallery (Paris)

As part of Pierret Jamet’s ‘Y’a d’la joie‘ (There is joy) exhibition, ...

From 1981 to the beginning of 1984 I worked on a photography project as part of the New York Chinatown History Project (NYCHP), now the Museum of Chinese in America.  An older generation of Chinatown was being replaced by a rapidly expanding new influx of immigration. As a photographer, my goal was to document the transformation from an older and primarily male community (due to restrictive, discriminatory immigration laws) to a new generation of young families.

Recently I began scanning and making large prints of the Chinatown negatives. It’s exciting to revisit personal work that I did more than 30 years ago and interpret it digitally, a process that allows me the ability to get more out of a negative than I ever could in the darkroom. I’m able to give new life to old work. More importantly, time has changed me and the way that I see the work. I’ve found images, overlooked in the past, that due to the passage of time have taken on new meaning and import.

The early 1980’s was a unique time in the history of New York Chinatown. With the passage of time I see how my documentation of Chinatown life can both communicate what it felt like to live in Chinatown at that time and inform our current societal discussion of immigration.

http://budglickphoto.com/#/portfolio/chinatown-ny/ctown11

http://www.mocanyc.org

See more

PHOTOGRAPHER
Bud Glick