In short

Koudelka in Person at Anthology Film Archives

The Anthology Film Archives (New York) welcomes on Monday 26 the Czech photographer Josef Koudelka M...

Willy Ronis at Château de Tours

Tomorrow, Tuesday, June 27, will open the exhibition of the Jeu de Paume and the Château de Tours, ...

Richard Mosse Arrested in Greece

Irish photographer Richard Mosse, recently winner of the Pictet 2017 prize for his Heat Maps series ...
PHOTO OF THE DAY
Eve Arnold, School for non-violence, Virginia, 1960 © Eve Arnold/Magnum Photos
Eve Arnold, School for non-violence, Virginia, 1960 © Eve Arnold/Magnum Photos

According to the Bangladesh Disaster Management Bureau around 1.5 million people have been affected by this year flood. Rivers in the north started to rise in early July and by the 20th of July nearly all of them started to flow over the danger level. It caused floods in 6 districts, namely, Lalmonirhat, Kurigram, Gaibandha, Jamalpur, Sirajganj and Sunamganj initially and inundated crop fields and dwelling areas, washed away standing crops, houses and household’s assets, livestock and displaced the affected people.

Bangladesh is one of the most climate change-vulnerable and disaster-prone countries. The rivers of this country are facing tremendous environmental anomalies. They overflow during the rainy season but shrink in other seasons. Floods in our country are directly or indirectly related to sub-Himalayan countries like India, Bhutan, and Nepal. An understanding should be made to protect the eco-system in the regions to minimize the risks of flash floods, and to share the water resources as per international laws.

Probal Rashid