In short

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PHOTO OF THE DAY
Joe Shore, Marilyn Monroe (In shorts), 1952 © Joe Shore and Fahey/Klein Gallery, LA
Joe Shore, Marilyn Monroe (In shorts), 1952 © Joe Shore and Fahey/Klein Gallery, LA

Born in South Africa, Grey Villet traveled America and the world for LIFE magazine like an observant explorer, mapping its emotional contours in the faces and lives of its people. His in-depth, personal studies of the American scene of the 1950s through the 1970’s illuminated the complex reality of those years with a truth that, in his own words, were “as real as real could get.” His images of presidents and revolutionaries, sports heroes, and everyday people struggling for their rights tell an emotional and compelling story of an era that shaped the present. This exhibition currently on view at Monroe Gallery in Santa Fe, pays tribute to one of the most acclaimed photojournalists of the last century.

 

Grey Villet, A portrait of LIFE in America
May 5 — June 25, 2017
Monroe Gallery
112 Don Gaspar Ave
Santa Fe, NM 87501
USA

http://www.monroegallery.com/

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Event
Grey Villet: The Lovings

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ICP: Grey Villet and the Loving Story

He was six-feet-four inches tall, gangly and awkward, all knees and elbows. He wore a suit that was so wrinkled he might have slept in it the night before. As he framed his shots, the ash from his unfiltered Pall Mall dangled dangerously over his Nikon. But his subjects barely no...